Sixteen immigrants take shelter on Spanish islet near Morocco

The tiny islet where the group are staying
The tiny islet where the group are staying

A group of sixteen Moroccan immigrants have taken refuge on a Spanish islet after arriving by patera boat yesterday.

The group, which includes three pregnant women and three children, is thought to be the first to use the uninhibited Islet de Tierra to gain asylum.

There is currently speculation as to whether they could be part of a human trafficking operation run by organised crime groups using the Spanish islets in North Africa as new migration routes.

Although the islet is so close to the Moroccan coast – just 10 metres when the tide is out – its Spanish sovereignty means the group is now under the responsibility of Spain’s government.

The government has guaranteed humanitarian assistance to the group but admitted it is unsure of the next steps to take.

Article source: The Olive Press

Personally, I say leave them there. Don’t send any boats, helicopters or any people. They chose an uninhabited islet so I don’t suppose they will be there too long without food and water. They’ll just go back to Morocco. It’s not like they have to get a flight or a boat.

Most Spaniards unconcerned with Gibraltar disputes

Not important to many Spaniards
Not important to many Spaniards

SIX out of ten Spaniards do not think the dispute over Gibraltar is important enough to be part of the country’s foreign policy, according to a survey.

The findings come at a time of heightened tension between the UK and Spain over the issue of the Rock’s sovereignty and ongoing legal wrangling over fishing rights.

Half of right-wing voters rated the dispute with Gibraltar as ‘quite’ or ‘very’ important in Spain’s foreign policy, although this figure dropped below 30 per cent for voters on the left.

The poll, by the Real Instituto Elcano, also suggests a split in public opinion over the handling of the fishing dispute, with 44 per cent preferring to see an end to the hostilities.

However, 60 per cent of voters on the right want diplomatic pressure to be increased, while 51 per cent of liberal voters want tensions to be reduced.

Article source: The Olive Press